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By The Numbers

Workplace Survey, Findings

1.Workers are struggling to work effectively. 

When focus is compromised in pursuit of Collaboration, neither works well.

2. Effective workplaces balance focus and collaboration. 

Workplaces designed to enable collaboration without sacrificing employees’ ability to focus are more successful.

3. Choice drives performance and innovation. 

Employers who provide a spectrum of choices for when and where to work are seen as more innovative and have higher-performing employees.

 

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WHY MOST INNOVATION STRATEGIES FAIL?

For all the concern these days about innovation and the many wondrous systems developed to help new products succeed, a stark fact is that most innovations fail. Perhaps that is inevitable, part of the numbers game for success.

 

But long-time innovation consultant Stephen Shapiro, who once led Accenture’s practice in that area, argues it’s a sign that the best practices being followed aren’t working. He asks us to rethink one of the most famed pieces of advice on innovation, from the legendary Thomas Edison, who declared of his many failed attempts to produce an incandescent electric light: “I have not failed 700 times ... I have succeeded in proving that those 700 ways will not work. When I have eliminated the ways that will not work, I will find the way that will work.”

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 November 2012 14:33
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SOCIAL MEDIA INVADES THE WORKPLACE

Checking your Facebook or Twitter feed from the office?

Maybe you’re not allowed to, but experts say it’s increasingly difficult for employers to enforce policies that disconnect workers from social networks.

“There’s a lot of fear. Some companies are staying away from it, some companies are embracing it and there’s a whole lot of rogue stuff going on, said Robert Collins, a consultant and former chief information officer for Cognos, a firm purchased by IBM that produces software that tracks employee performance.

Collins said while some managers worry about productivity loss, there’s no evidence to show social media or Internet use has any impact on productivity overall.

“Before this technology people found other ways to waste time, chatting to co-workers or on the phone,” he said. “There will always be problems with individuals. Those problems have to be addressed individually.”

With mobile devices, it’s no longer possible or even desirable to simply close off access, said Collins. For some workers, particularly those in communications there’s even a potential productivity gain, he said.

Employers need to face up to reality — social media is here to stay, he said.

“If your organization is not there on Facebook, not there putting out tweets, putting out a blog, somebody is going to fill the vacuum and they’re not going to be doing it in the interest of your company,” he said. 

Having a strong social media presence can counteract rogue or critical tweets, he said.

Employers also need to tell employees what is and isn’t acceptable on social media. Some employers see personal social media use by employees as reflecting on them and some even ask employees to use their personal accounts for business purposes.

“There isn’t any law on any of this. It’s all in the realm of corporate policies,” said University of Ottawa law professor Michael Geist.

Collins and other experts say firms reap huge payoffs in extra time worked due to employees using mobile devices and laptops at home.

Carleton University professor and expert on organizational health Linda Duxbury said in her research that the intrusion into home life isn’t balanced by employees using social media or running errands online at work.

“It’s all one way. The expectation is that you do work at home,” said Duxbury, adding people always had this pressure, but technology makes it easier.

Collins and Duxbury both said employees need to set rules about when they will and won’t be connected.

“It’s better to have that conversation with your boss when it isn’t a problem,” said Collins.

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 November 2012 14:33

BY THE NUMBERS

Workplace Survey, Findings

1.Workers are struggling to work effectively. 

When focus is compromised in pursuit of Collaboration, neither works well.

2. Effective workplaces balance focus and collaboration. 

Workplaces designed to enable collaboration without sacrificing employees’ ability to focus are more successful.

3. Choice drives performance and innovation. 

Employers who provide a spectrum of choices for when and where to work are seen as more innovative and have higher-performing employees.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 November 2013 01:59

LinkedIn Study: Top Office Pet Peeves Revealed In Global Survey

The perils of working a nine-to-five can test even the sanest of office workers.

Americans find people who steal their food the most irritating, while office gossip truly annoys Brazilians.

Those are some of the findings from a new LinkedIn study that uncovers the top office pet peeves throughout the world.

In a survey of 17,000 people, the findings also showed the Japanese don't appreciate office pranks, just as Indians find annoying ringtones to be the most blood boiling habit. If you happen to be in Germany, make sure you clean up after yourself, because dirty common areas frustrate the Germans more than any other nation.

According to LinkedIn's infographic, India was the country with the most office pet peeves, while Italy had the fewest and the U.S. fell in the middle, theFinancial Post reported.

Meanwhile, the study also looked at gender. A majority of American women surveyed (62%) were most irked by inappropriate clothing, but only 29% of American men felt that was a problem.

Yet there are some things that irritate people no matter what culture or gender. The number one pet peeve of all professionals worldwide? People not taking ownership for their actions ranking at 78%. 

In an interview with Forbes, Nicole Williams, LinkedIn's Connection Director said "Many just don't realize their behavior may be annoying, and it can be a career killer if you never correct it. Young employees may also take the feedback personally and overreact."

Williams explained in a press statement, brushing it under the carpet is not the answer. "It is crucial for you to solve the annoyance before it disrupts your work performance and career."

But if the findings of this LinkedIn survey still haven't calmed you, why not contribute to a website called AnnoyingCoworker.com. Not only can you vent your frustrations anonymously, but you can also commiserate with other people ticked off from over sharing or inconsiderate colleagues.

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 November 2012 14:33

HOW THE INTERNET IS CHANGING THE WAY OUR MEMORIES WORK

The advent of the Internet, with sophisticated algorithmic search engines, has made accessing information as easy as lifting a finger. No longer do we have to make costly efforts to find the things we want. We can “Google” the old classmate, find articles online, or look up the actor who was on the tip of our tongue. The results of four studies suggest that when faced with difficult questions, people are primed to think about computers and that when people expect to have future access to information, they have lower rates of recall of the information itself and enhanced recall instead for where to access it. The Internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory, where information is stored collectively outside ourselves.

Last Updated on Thursday, 15 November 2012 14:33